Community Colleges Could Win From Renewal of Job-Training Act

Community Colleges Stand to Gain From Renewal of Job-Training Act 1

Cathy Van Zyl, Mt. Hood Community College

A student learns welding at Mt. Hood Community College, which plays a major role in job-training programs in and around Portland, Ore.

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close Community Colleges Stand to Gain From Renewal of Job-Training Act 1

Cathy Van Zyl, Mt. Hood Community College

A student learns welding at Mt. Hood Community College, which plays a major role in job-training programs in and around Portland, Ore.

Community colleges are poised to take on a more central role in federal job-training programs as policy makers lay the groundwork for a long-overdue renewal of the multibillion-dollar Workforce Investment Act.

The two-year colleges have not, for the most part, served as primary providers of the education and training that is financed by the federal program. The grants regulated by the law have been used more often to help people find jobs than to train them for new types of